7 Theories of Human Nature

 Seven Theories of Human Nature is a general introduction to philosophical anthropology. Written by Leslie Stevenson, who was a Reader in Logic and Metaphysics at the University of St. Andrews, this book focuses not only on major theories of what it is to be a human being but it also makes suggestions for how toContinue reading “7 Theories of Human Nature”

Is Theosis a soteriological or anthropological doctrine?

Theosis, write Stephen Finlan and Valdimir Kharlamov, is closely related to a number of other doctrines including: soteriology, Christology, anthropology, the sacraments, personal eschatology, the imago dei, redemption, and sanctification. Despite the doctrine’s connections to a number of other theological loci, in the minds of many—especially those who find their theological bearings in the West—the doctrineContinue reading “Is Theosis a soteriological or anthropological doctrine?”

Non-Reductive Physicalism – Some Problems (Part 2)

Yesterday, I mentioned one challenge that non-reductive physicalists face. Today I’d like to mention two more. The Problem of the Intermediate State… A second challenge that the nonreductive physicalist faces is the problem of the intermediate state and the afterlife. All physicalist accounts face the problem of a “gappy existence” during the intermediate state. ThatContinue reading “Non-Reductive Physicalism – Some Problems (Part 2)”

Non-Reductive Physicalism – Some Problems (Part 1)

Holding to non-Reductive physicalism has some benefits…. First, it takes seriously the dualist’s intuition—and the biblical data—that we cannot be reduced to the material; that is, we are more than merely matter. Second, it might avoid the reductionist pitfall of eliminating moral responsibility. Some people, like Nancey Murphy, have argued that can provide an accountContinue reading “Non-Reductive Physicalism – Some Problems (Part 1)”

Priests of Creation and a Dead Mountain Lion

Yesterday I heard some heartbreaking news: P-47, a 3-year-old mountain lion has died in the Santa Monica Mountains after being infected with rat poison. P-47 was one of the largest mountain lion observed in the National Park Services study in Los Angeles. This got me thinking about humanity’s vocation in relation to creation. In studying T.F. TorranceContinue reading “Priests of Creation and a Dead Mountain Lion”

Theology and Science at the Tyndale Conference

This year’s “Christian Doctrine Section” of the Tyndale Fellowship Conference is being organized by Jason Sexton and Tom Noble. It is dedicated to the topic of “Theology and Science.” The program differs a bit from how the conference was previously conducted. Instead of the regular 45-50 minute paper, the organizers are arranging each portion of theContinue reading “Theology and Science at the Tyndale Conference”

Priests of Creation – A Reflection for Earth Day

Man has been called to be a kind of midwife to creation, in assisting nature out of its divinely given abundance constant only to give birth to new forms of life and richer patterns of order. – T.F. Torrance, The Goodness and Dignity of Man On this day, Earth Day 2019, I want to suggest–byContinue reading “Priests of Creation – A Reflection for Earth Day”

What is the “Image of God?”

In the last few blog posts I shared a bit about how to approach the “image of God” and some of the shared assumptions most theologians have about the doctrine. Now we can finally turn our attention to the meaning of the “image of God” in contemporary theology. This term’s meaning typically falls into oneContinue reading “What is the “Image of God?””

Six Assumptions About The Meaning of the “Imago Dei”

Although there is deep disagreement concerning what being made in the image of God means, most theologians share a common set of assumptions regarding the doctrine. Let me share a few – specifically six – of those assumptions with you. Most theologians agree that the terms in Genesis 1, selem and demut, connote reflection andContinue reading “Six Assumptions About The Meaning of the “Imago Dei””

Constructing Landscapes of Interiority in Second Temple Judaism

Yesterday I had the privilege of attending day two of the 2019 Payton Lectures at Fuller Seminary. The speaker was Carol Newsom, from Emory. Her topic for the lecture series was senses of the self in ancient Judaism. Below are my notes from yesterday’s lecture. Q:How strange and different were the ancient Israelites? Questions aboutContinue reading “Constructing Landscapes of Interiority in Second Temple Judaism”