A Theology of Personal Being

In a short essay titled “A Theology of Personal Being,” John Macquarrie makes three assertions about what it means to be a human being. First, “a human person is a being on the way.” (172) Humans are “unfinished” – this is in contrast with traditional views that regard human nature as some sort of fixedContinue reading “A Theology of Personal Being”

Paul and the Person: Reframing Paul’s Anthropology

Susan Eastman’s book, Paul and the Person: Reframing Paul’s Anthropology is an attempt to generate a three-way conversation between stoic understandings of personhood, contemporary cognitive science/philosophy, and Pauline scholarship. She argues that Paul’s writings—at least in modern scholarship—have been read through the lens of Enlightenment assumptions about persons as autonomous, discrete, self-determining individuals. As EastmanContinue reading “Paul and the Person: Reframing Paul’s Anthropology”

Trinitarian Personhood

William Ury is Professor of Systematic and Historical Theology at Wesley Biblical Seminary, Trinitarian Personhood is the published version of his dissertation undertaken at Drew University. Part of the reason Ury undertook this project was because he noticed a “bankruptcy of modern thought with regard to personhood.” (4) He attributes this bankruptcy to a lackContinue reading “Trinitarian Personhood”

Podcast Alert: Prayer, Free Will, and Determinism with Chris Woznicki

I recently recored a Podcast with Ryan Mullins on human nature, prayer, and free will. You can listen to it here or on Spotify! In today’s episode, I sit down with Chris Woznicki. He recently won the IVP Early Career Philosopher of Religion prize for an essay that he wrote on human free will, determinism,Continue reading “Podcast Alert: Prayer, Free Will, and Determinism with Chris Woznicki”

Persons in Communion

Karl Barth famously made the decision to speak of “modes of being” (Seinsweise) rather than persons when speaking of the Trinity. There are several reasons why Barth decided not to adopt “person” language. For example, Barth was concerned that the term “prosopon” too closely implied a form of Sabellianism, where persons were like masks ofContinue reading “Persons in Communion”

Communion and Otherness

In Communion and Otherness, John Zizioulas expands and elaborates upon ideas that were presented in Being and Communion. What sets this book from the earlier book is that instead of focusing on how communion is related to being he focuses on how otherness is related to being – what ties together communion and otherness isContinue reading “Communion and Otherness”

Being and Communion

When Being as Communion came out (especially in English) generated much discussion regarding the doctrine of the Trinity and the doctrine’s relationship to ecclesiology. Although many Trinitarian theologians would say that the divide between Eastern and Western Trinitarian theologies has been overplayed, Zizioulas emphasis on the uniqueness of Orthodox Trinitarian theology leads to many constructive claims. TheseContinue reading “Being and Communion”

Persons – What Philosophers Say About You

Warren Bourgeois attempts to tackle a set of perennial questions in Persons: What Philosophers Say About You. These questions include, “What are persons?” “What makes this person now identical to that person in the past?” and “What marks the beginning and end of a person.” Bouorgeois’s questions are, in part, motivated by events that areContinue reading “Persons – What Philosophers Say About You”

The Call to Personhood

In The Call to Personhood Alistair McFadyen expresses concern about two unsatisfactory conceptions of individuality and personality, these two conceptions are Individualism and Collectivism. Individualism attempts to maintain personal freedom and autonomy and Collectivism tries to take social relations and institutions seriously. However, when each of these two conceptions of personality get pressed too farContinue reading “The Call to Personhood”

I and Thou

Martin Buber’s I and Thou begins with the claim that “to man the world is twofold.” Human beings exist and interact with the world in two different ways. These ways are the “I-Thou” relation and the “I-It” relation. The first kind of relation, he says can only be spoken with the whole being, the secondContinue reading “I and Thou”