Jonathan Edwards Center Inaugural Conference

In less than two weeks Gateway Seminary will be hosting the first conference at their new Jonathan Edwards Center. The lineup looks great. You can register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/regeneration-revival-and-creation-the-jonathan-edwards-center-conference-tickets-48045672901 If you are on the fence about going, here are the plenary speakers’ paper titles: Plenary Speakers Douglas Sweeney – Distinguished professor of church history and the historyContinue reading “Jonathan Edwards Center Inaugural Conference”

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Domestic Violence, Refugees, and the Imago Dei in John Calvin’s Pastoral Theology

How did John Calvin deal with a massive influx of refugees and cases of domestic violence and maintain pastoral faithfulness? Jesse Gentile and I explore these questions in a new essay titled, “Refocusing the Image: Domestic Violence, Refugees, and the Imago Dei in John Calvin’s Pastoral Theology.” You can find the essay in the latestContinue reading “Domestic Violence, Refugees, and the Imago Dei in John Calvin’s Pastoral Theology”

Objectivity is Not Neutrality

I came across a paragraph in Thomas Haskell’s Objectivity is Not Neutrality that I think bears on so much more than merely historical studies. The concept that objectivity is not neutrality can and should apply to may matters of judgement: What I champion under the rubric “objectivity” is not neutrality or passionlessness but that “vital minimumContinue reading “Objectivity is Not Neutrality”

My Most Significant Publication Yet…

I received a copy of Philosophia Christi (The journal of the Evangelical Philosophical Society) in the mail today. It contains my article, “Peter Martyr Vermigli’s Account of Petitionary Prayer.” As wierd as it sounds this is the most personally significant essay I have ever published…. The year was 2007 and I was sitting in myContinue reading “My Most Significant Publication Yet…”

Salvation at Stake

Today we wrap-up a mini-series on the philosophy of doing history. The final essay in we will look at in this series is a chapter from Brad Gregory’s Salvation at Stake. This final essay represents the strongest set of arguments against a form of historiography dominated by what have variously been called, “the new historicism,”Continue reading “Salvation at Stake”

The Lady Vanishes: Dilemmas of a Feminist Historian after the “Linguistic Turn”

Today we continue a mini-series on the philosophy of doing history. In the next few days we will take a look at all sorts of views regarding how to do history. These views range from critical realist accounts all the way to post-structuralist accounts and even some feminist accounts. “Has the lady vanished?” When ElizabethContinue reading “The Lady Vanishes: Dilemmas of a Feminist Historian after the “Linguistic Turn””

Last Will and Testament of an Ex-Literary Critic

Today we continue a mini-series on the philosophy of doing history. In the next few days we will take a look at all sorts of views regarding how to do history. These views range from critical realist accounts all the way to post-structuralist accounts and even some feminist accounts. “Last Will and Testament of anContinue reading “Last Will and Testament of an Ex-Literary Critic”

The “New” Historicism

Today we continue a mini-series on the philosophy of doing history. In the next few days we will take a look at all sorts of views regarding how to do history. These views range from critical realist accounts all the way to post-structuralist accounts and even some feminist accounts. What happens when E.H. Carr’s claimContinue reading “The “New” Historicism”

The Epistemological Foundations of History: Bloch and Carr’s Philosophy of History Compared

Today we begin a mini-series on the philosophy of doing history. In the next few days we will take a look at all sorts of views regarding how to do history. These views range from critical realist accounts all the way to post-structuralist accounts and even some feminist accounts. The Epistemological Foundations of History: BlochContinue reading “The Epistemological Foundations of History: Bloch and Carr’s Philosophy of History Compared”

Was the Reformation a Mistake?

Today we celebrate (mourn, think about, reflect upon, take your pick) the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation. With this momentous event upon us, numerous people have turned their attention to the various historical and contemporary implications of the Reformation. You can see this in the number of books, articles, and blogs that have beenContinue reading “Was the Reformation a Mistake?”